Tuesday, 14 January 2020

Speckled Alder (Alnus incana) Fungi



This is an ongoing list of fungi I've found growing on Speckled Alder (Alnus incana) in my wetland in central Ontario. Alders are lanky shrub-trees that don't mind getting their feet wet. Since I have no hip waders and the swamp, when flooded, is full of leeches, my primary collecting season is mid- to late winter when water is more solid.


Basidiomycetes


Gilled

Lentinellus micheneri
Panellus stipticus
Plicaturopsis crispa (see my post)

Schizophyllum commune

Tectella patellaris

Polypores


Datroniella scutellata (see my post) 
Fomitoporia punctata
Gloeoporous dichrous
Irpex lactea
Polyporus brumalis
Steccherinum nitidum
Trametes hirsuta
Trametes pubescens
Trametes versicolor

Tyromyces chioneus on birch – some infected 
with Protocrea pallida (see below in Ascomycetes)

Jellies 



Dacrymyces stillatus
Exidia nigricans (Exidia glandulosa in Europe)
Exidia crenata (Exidia recisa in Europe)

Exidia repanda
Exidiopsis effusa (grown on "hair ice" stick)
Hair ice produced by Exidiopsis effusa mycelium
(Scientific American Hair Ice article)
Myxarium nucleatum (Exidia nucleata)

Clubs

Microtyphula fistula var. contorta

Toothed 


Steccherinum ochraceum (& Datroniella scutellata)

Crusts

Hymenochaete corrugata
Hymenochaete corrugata produces melanized 
pseudosclerotial plates that can "glue" branches together 


Peniophora cinerea
Phlebia radiata
Plicatura nivea (see my post)

Cyphelloids

Merismoides fasciculata
(see my posts about Cyphelloid Fungi 1 & 2)

Stromatocyphella conglobata 
(see my posts about cyphelloid fungi 1 & 2)



Ascomycetes

Cups & Related

Encoelia furfuracea

Encoelia furfuracea rehydrated
Propolis farinosa
Ionomidotis fulvotingens

Lachnum virgineum 

Tympanis alnea
Velutarina rufo-olivacea

Carbons & Related


Daldinia childiae (see my post)

Hypoxylon fuscum

Leucostoma sp.

Miscellaneous

Hypocrea pallida (parasitic on Tyromyces chioneus)

Stenocybe pullatula (see my "fairy pins" post

Taphrina robinsoniana
Anamorphs


Xylocoremium flabelliforme (anamorph of Xylaria Cubensis)


Myxomycetes


Badhamia utricularis (growing on Trametes hirsuta)
(see my post about this slime mold)





Copyright © Jan Thornhill 2020



6 comments:

  1. You are a fountain of information. Are all these fungi still active in winter, or dormant? (just read your previous blog about speingrails where you mentioned spores being released in winter)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A majority of these species will produce spores when it warms above freezing, especially if they're rehydrated by rain.

      Delete
  2. Jan, Wonderfully informative. I've never seen many of these, or didn't know the names. Thanks! Tim Myles

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  3. Unbelievable variety! I recognize the Trametes . . .

    ReplyDelete